Foyle requires an explanation from his friend, Stephen Beck.

Gorgeous catchlights.

Pop Culture Comfort Food You Can Turn to When You Need a Break From President Trump (Slate.com):

This very British series is a police procedural set in Hastings, England, during World War II. But it’s also about Christopher Foyle (played by the great Michael Kitchen), a good cop and a great man, who always manages to do the right thing, even when bending the rules might seem like the expedient thing to do. A prolonged ode to integrity seems like it might be useful viewing these days.

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To Michael Kitchen’s eight minutes in an eight-hour series.

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Foyle, the master of brevity, knows when he’s said enough to bring the guilty party to his knees.

And Michael Kitchen knows how to use his incomparable mouth shrug and eyes to maximum effect.

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More John Farrow in 2017?

Hopefully, more adorable outtakes, too.



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Casually easy on the eyes.

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Foyle and the colors of fall.


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Goodbye, Mr. Foyle.


KT said:

John Donne said, “No man is an island, entire of itself.” but, I’d argue, that Foyle comes as close to proving him wrong as any fictional character and MK played that perfectly.

This is inspired. Thank you for sharing, KT. In light of your comment, I particularly got a kick out of this New Yorker cartoon. →

Mary McNamara of the LA Times makes “a case for an Emmy (or more) for Foyle’s War:

Created and written almost entirely by bestselling novelist Anthony Horowitz, “Foyle’s War” is the Mona Lisa of television: small, quiet, utterly hypnotic and mysteriously perfect.

A small and often silent man, as kind as he is morally rigorous, Foyle stands guard over basic humanity as the whirlwind of war and modernity threatens to uproot the good with the bad. Year after year, he has been brought to vivid vibrant life by Kitchen, an actor of rare and controlled brilliance. Each season, he gave the performance of a hundred lifetimes while appearing to do little more than shrug off his coat, bite his lip and refuse endless offers of tea.

…the final episode of the series, “Elise,” is what the American-based Acorn TV, which has co-produced the series since its return, will submit in all the relevant television movie categories — some of which it better win, despite the low-key nature of its radiance and, perhaps more significant, the famous long-standing refusal of its leading man to do any publicity.

Neither should matter at all if the awards are truly about excellence.

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Michael Kitchen is all sun-kissed gorgeousness and gentlemanly charm as Berkeley Cole in Out of Africa.

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thumb the eternity ring thumb the russia house thumb the railway children thumb the last contract thumb the justice game thumb the hanging gale thumb the guilty thumb to play the king
thumb reckless thumb the comedy of errors thumb the browning version thumb oliver twist thumb the four beauties thumb out of africa
thumb mrs dalloway thumb mozart on tour thumb minder thumb falling thumb enchanted april thumb love song
thumb dykket thumb doomsday gun thumb dandelion dead thumb caught on a train thumb brimstone and treacle thumb brian pern thumb alibi thumb freud
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Mr. Kitchen is possibly the eighth wonder of the world. Never flashy … but nevertheless the center of every frame in which he appears.hikari

From John Powers’s review of Foyle’s War on NPR:

What makes the whole thing irresistible is Michael Kitchen’s enthralling performance as Foyle, who, in his reticence, sly humor and triumphant decency, is our fantasy of the ideal Englishman.

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Beautiful Michael Kitchen/Richard Crane.

anonymous said:

Thank you KF, you always make my day! Perhaps Reckless should have been titled Breathless? At least that’s how MK playing Richard Crane leaves me feeling. ;- )

Seems we do a good job of making each other’s day.  Completely agree about that feeling of breathlessness MK brings on whenever he appears in Reckless.  🙂


Nope, I wouldn’t either, Richard.

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Another one of the gorgeous closeup shots of Michael Kitchen from A Lesson in Murder. ****

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Freud reminisces about happier times when von Fleischl generously picked up the tab and took him under his wing.  Even a big, bushy beard can’t hide the adorableness of Michael Kitchen’s smile that’s replicated the following year in Out of Africa.

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Christopher Foyle/Michael Kitchen smiles, and the room lights up…

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Having an actor as gifted and exacting as Michael Kitchen interpret one’s work is undoubtedly a huge boon to writers, but it’s not without its challenges as Anthony Horowitz has described in interviews:

Michael is as responsible as I am for the character of Foyle. Michael Kitchen has always been one of our most revered actors here in Britain. He had never done a long-running television series until Foyle’s War. The only reason he took it on, I think, was because I was able to persuade him that it wouldn’t just be a case of him getting a thud of an envelope through a door every two weeks with a new script; he would be very much part of the creative process. That is what we have done for nearly ten years. It’s not always been easy. Michael is very demanding. One of the funny things about him is that he’s the only actor I know who demands fewer lines. He’ll look at a speech and say to me, “Actually I can do all of that — five lines — with one look.” And the annoying thing is, he’s always right; he can — which means I have to write more dialogue for the other actors to fill out the episode. – PBS Q&A for Series 7

Curiously, he had never taken the lead in a long series. In part, this may have been down to his reputation for being ‘difficult’. …Was he difficult? He was certainly demanding – utterly focused on the character with a rigid determination to ensure that the integrity and the quality of the drama would never be compromised. Sometimes, he would cut or rewrite a scene hours before it was due to be filmed, and I won’t pretend that this wasn’t frustrating. But for him the performance was everything, and the result is there on the screen. I have no doubt at all that a huge part of the success of the show was down to Michael. – Daily Mail (Jan. 5, 2008)

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Is this an offshoot of “Trailer Park“? I wonder whatever happened to Vigilantes.

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From an interview with Margaret Atwood in the Calgary Herald:

Asked if she binge-watches series, Atwood said she does, but with boxed DVD sets.

“What we just finished was an English series called ‘Foyle’s War,’ set in (the Second World War). It’s very good,” she said.

She added with her signature wry wit: “People of our generation like it because we recognize all the outfits. We were there.”

“Foyle’s War” is a far cry from “The Handmaid’s Tale“, but each in its way is scarily relevant today at a time when the dark undercurrents of society are coming to the fore.

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Celebrating this Earth Day and the March for Science with Faraday’s Dream (YouTube link via the FWAS), a short drama documentary in which a dreamy Michael Kitchen portrays the brilliant English scientist, Michael Faraday. Released in 1991 in honor of the 200th anniversary of Faraday’s birth (also the year his image was placed on the £20 note that remained in circulation until 2001), the film won the top four awards at the International Science Film Festival.

Were he alive today, the civic-minded Faraday would no doubt be appalled by the Trump administration’s reliance on “alternative facts” and its concerted attack on science and the environment. Alan Hirshfeld, the author of The Electric Life of Michael Faraday, writes in the book’s preface that Faraday was a powerful advocate for “science education and environmental responsibilty,” using his prestige to denounce “the public’s propensity toward superstition and pseudoscience” and to campaign for urban pollution mitigation.

In showcasing the great Victorian scientist’s charisma, good humor, and relentless enthusiasm for scientific exploration and education, Michael Kitchen makes the perfect on-screen Faraday.

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Faraday and his wife sadly could not have children of their own, but unlike the fictional childless marriages depicted in several of Michael Kitchen’s other films, the Faradays remained devoted to each other and made the best of their situation by often hosting their nieces and nephews. What fun to see Michael Kitchen playing a man with such an affinity for kids.

Sarah Faraday was played by Ann Penfold, who was Anne opposite MK’s Branwell.

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Faraday’s nieces were lucky to live with an uncle who
valued their education, rare for girls at that time. Here Michael Kitchen endearingly captures the delight Faraday takes in demonstrating to his young, in-house audience
the generation of electricity from a battery.

And later he unveils to them his groundbreaking electric motor based on electromagnetic rotation:





The open dish of mercury, though. Yikes. Faraday’s regular exposure to mercury while conducting experiments could be why he suffered from headaches and memory loss later in life.

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Remember the glass rod and the feather? A magnet is much heavier than a feather, isn’t it?

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Faraday understandably rushes to publish his exciting findings on electromagnetic rotation, with the unfortunate result of ruffling the feathers of some of his colleagues, including his mentor Humphry Davy.

Ten years later in 1831, Faraday achieves another momentous breakthrough, the discovery of magnetic induction.

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One doesn’t usually think of scientists as devout Christians, but Faraday certainly fell into the category as does the evangelical climate scientist, Katharine Hayhoe, whom I came across in this New Yorker podcast. At the end of the compelling piece when asked how successful she’s been in converting evangelicals skeptical of climate change, Hayhoe responds that “for every one letter or comment or email I get saying, ‘Well, you’re not a real scientist because you’re a Christian,’ I get about a hundred saying, ‘Well, you’re not a real Christian because you’re a scientist.'” I’d like to see them try telling Michael Faraday that science and religion are mutually exclusive. Such abhorrent close-mindedness and antagonism toward scientists make the promotion and popularization of science all the more important.

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I’m going to assume this is what Michael Kitchen’s handwriting looks like when he uses a dip pen.

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Thinking, thinking, thinking, eureka!



Alternating current!

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Now known as the Faraday effect.

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