Foyle requires an explanation from his friend, Stephen Beck.

Gorgeous catchlights.

Pop Culture Comfort Food You Can Turn to When You Need a Break From President Trump (Slate.com):

This very British series is a police procedural set in Hastings, England, during World War II. But it’s also about Christopher Foyle (played by the great Michael Kitchen), a good cop and a great man, who always manages to do the right thing, even when bending the rules might seem like the expedient thing to do. A prolonged ode to integrity seems like it might be useful viewing these days.

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To Michael Kitchen’s eight minutes in an eight-hour series.

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Foyle, the master of brevity, knows when he’s said enough to bring the guilty party to his knees.

And Michael Kitchen knows how to use his incomparable mouth shrug and eyes to maximum effect.

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More John Farrow in 2017?

Hopefully, more adorable outtakes, too.



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Casually easy on the eyes.

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Foyle and the colors of fall.


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Goodbye, Mr. Foyle.


KT said:

John Donne said, “No man is an island, entire of itself.” but, I’d argue, that Foyle comes as close to proving him wrong as any fictional character and MK played that perfectly.

This is inspired. Thank you for sharing, KT. In light of your comment, I particularly got a kick out of this New Yorker cartoon. →

Mary McNamara of the LA Times makes “a case for an Emmy (or more) for Foyle’s War:

Created and written almost entirely by bestselling novelist Anthony Horowitz, “Foyle’s War” is the Mona Lisa of television: small, quiet, utterly hypnotic and mysteriously perfect.

A small and often silent man, as kind as he is morally rigorous, Foyle stands guard over basic humanity as the whirlwind of war and modernity threatens to uproot the good with the bad. Year after year, he has been brought to vivid vibrant life by Kitchen, an actor of rare and controlled brilliance. Each season, he gave the performance of a hundred lifetimes while appearing to do little more than shrug off his coat, bite his lip and refuse endless offers of tea.

…the final episode of the series, “Elise,” is what the American-based Acorn TV, which has co-produced the series since its return, will submit in all the relevant television movie categories — some of which it better win, despite the low-key nature of its radiance and, perhaps more significant, the famous long-standing refusal of its leading man to do any publicity.

Neither should matter at all if the awards are truly about excellence.

Kivrin has written a lovely Foyle vignette that picks up after this final scene.

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Michael Kitchen is all sun-kissed gorgeousness and gentlemanly charm as Berkeley Cole in Out of Africa.

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Michael Kitchen makes even the most mundane dialogue interesting to watch.

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Mr. Kitchen is possibly the eighth wonder of the world. Never flashy … but nevertheless the center of every frame in which he appears.hikari

From John Powers’s review of Foyle’s War on NPR:

What makes the whole thing irresistible is Michael Kitchen’s enthralling performance as Foyle, who, in his reticence, sly humor and triumphant decency, is our fantasy of the ideal Englishman.

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Beautiful Michael Kitchen/Richard Crane.

anonymous said:

Thank you KF, you always make my day! Perhaps Reckless should have been titled Breathless? At least that’s how MK playing Richard Crane leaves me feeling. ;- )

Seems we do a good job of making each other’s day.  Completely agree about that feeling of breathlessness MK brings on whenever he appears in Reckless.  🙂


Nope, I wouldn’t either, Richard.

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Another one of the gorgeous closeup shots of Michael Kitchen from A Lesson in Murder. ****

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Freud reminisces about happier times when von Fleischl generously picked up the tab and took him under his wing.  Even a big, bushy beard can’t hide the adorableness of Michael Kitchen’s smile that’s replicated the following year in Out of Africa.

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Christopher Foyle/Michael Kitchen smiles, and the room lights up…

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Having an actor as gifted and exacting as Michael Kitchen interpret one’s work is undoubtedly a huge boon to writers, but it’s not without its challenges as Anthony Horowitz has described in interviews:

Michael is as responsible as I am for the character of Foyle. Michael Kitchen has always been one of our most revered actors here in Britain. He had never done a long-running television series until Foyle’s War. The only reason he took it on, I think, was because I was able to persuade him that it wouldn’t just be a case of him getting a thud of an envelope through a door every two weeks with a new script; he would be very much part of the creative process. That is what we have done for nearly ten years. It’s not always been easy. Michael is very demanding. One of the funny things about him is that he’s the only actor I know who demands fewer lines. He’ll look at a speech and say to me, “Actually I can do all of that — five lines — with one look.” And the annoying thing is, he’s always right; he can — which means I have to write more dialogue for the other actors to fill out the episode. – PBS Q&A for Series 7

Curiously, he had never taken the lead in a long series. In part, this may have been down to his reputation for being ‘difficult’. …Was he difficult? He was certainly demanding – utterly focused on the character with a rigid determination to ensure that the integrity and the quality of the drama would never be compromised. Sometimes, he would cut or rewrite a scene hours before it was due to be filmed, and I won’t pretend that this wasn’t frustrating. But for him the performance was everything, and the result is there on the screen. I have no doubt at all that a huge part of the success of the show was down to Michael. – Daily Mail (Jan. 5, 2008)

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Dunkirk was spectacular and kept me on the edge of my seat throughout, but at a fraction of the budget and scale, the treatment of the momentous event in Foyle’s War was no less affecting, if not more…

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At the alarming rate that far-right judges are being appointed to lower-court benches, it won’t be long before we lose a vital bastion against Trumpism.

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And, of course, what follows is Michael Kitchen’s beautiful delivery of a speech that’s at once touching, romantic, and humorous.

Dominic Dromgoole wrote in The Sunday Times (Aug. 31, 2003):

Kitchen and Okonedo are two of our best actors. They managed to play a substantial story of growing love without any intense stares or moist lips or fidgety signals. There was a lone touching of the upper arm. What they played was a slow-growing spread of trust between two people, and what is love if not trust?

Me, too! Sophie Okonedo and Michael Kitchen are a dream team.

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Michael Kitchen and family attend Tom Stoppard’s birthday party at the Chelsea Physic Garden in London on July 1.

He’s gotten his thirty-something figure back.

Michael Kitchen and his wife were also photographed together at the 1994 BAFTA Awards where he was a best actor nominee for To Play the King.

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Is it too much to ask that the POTUS possess none of the disturbing character traits exhibited in these Michael Kitchen portrayals…



and more of the qualities found in Michael Faraday and Christopher Foyle?






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Way to go, DC Circuit Court of Appeals, for ruling that suspending an EPA methane rule is “unreasonable”, “arbitrary”, and “capricious” — words that could be used to describe every action of the Trump administration. (Just what we need for dealing with North Korea.)

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Foyle pays another visit to Joyce Corrigan to deliver bad news about her son.

Enjoyed watching Emma Fielding last night playing a considerably larger part, Miss Galindo, a character as outspoken and right-minded as Foyle.

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Latest study finds that several cups of coffee
each day is good for one’s health.



The letter Annie Lennox received reminds me of Michael Kitchen’s infamous coffee shop encounter that was so amusingly recounted by Honeysuckle Weeks for the Daily Mail:

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Michael Kitchen’s pained expression here almost makes me feel sorry for Roman as he eavesdrops on Anna and hears what she really thinks of him.  Later, he spitefully repeats her words back to her.

Roman’s behavior is supposed to be that of a man unhinged, yet here we are now with a POTUS who just like Roman makes women’s flesh creep and viciously lashes out at those who speak the truth about him. Unbelievable to see lying and bullying on a par with Henry Kent coming from the POTUS.




(Spot-on commentary from LB in praise of MK’s brilliance.)

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Since it’s National Handshake Day…



Like VIPs who have visited the White House this year, Jack Turner is the victim of an awkward handshake. Customary bowing, in my opinion, is preferable to shaking hands, especially when one must deal with a head of state whose hands have been grabbing the nether regions of untold women. For those with a bad back, though, I suppose a handshake is less taxing.

(Not quite the Michael Kitchen/Stella Gonet reunion I hoped for.)

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Messing about with the photographic files in the archive. What I do on a daily basis with little risk of detection.

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A Foyle’s War birthday cake! Looks too good to eat.

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I’d be happy if they just cast Michael Kitchen in a part.

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Two of these actors are currently appearing in the blockbuster film I saw today. Sadly, Michael Kitchen isn’t one of them.

Wonder Woman is seriously good entertainment.

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The silent exchange between Foyle and Andrew speaks volumes about the closeness of their relationship.












“Dad. It’s good to see you.”

Exceedingly good to see Michael Kitchen play Dad to Julian Ovenden’s Andrew Foyle.

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John Farrow on being a dad.

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