Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 1Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 2
Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 3Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 4
Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 5Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 6
Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 7Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 8
Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 9Caught on a Train: Michael Kitchen: Peggy Ashcroft: magazines scene 10

Love the praise heaped on Michael Kitchen in filmycks.com’s review of Caught on a Train:

The two leads turn in powerhouse performances, possibly the finest of their respective careers. Ashcroft may have been the flashier but for Kitchen to craft such a complex creation as Peter out of rather simple material, marked him as one of the finest actors of his generation. Notoriously media-shy he has spent most of his career within television and exemplary as his work has been, his relative absence from the big screen is certainly cinema’s loss. To get a sense of his talent, one only has to view a brief moment within a single scene in Caught on a Train. After Peter’s initial meeting with Messner, she plays upon her age and frailty and asks if he will go and buy some magazines from a vendor. It will mean leaving the train (which is still stationary at Ostend) and Peter has no intention of doing so. Consequently, he begins to equivocate and invent various excuses as to why he shouldn’t. Messner bats each of these away (‘It is only a short distance, you won’t even have to run’) and when it looks like he will have no choice but to acquiesce, a station guard’s whistle is heard. Peter believes he is saved from the task because the whistle indicates the train is about to leave. However, just before he can inform Messner another passenger states that the whistle isn’t for their train much to the chagrin of Peter. The moment lasts barely a second and yet within this screen-time Kitchen displays relief, then triumph, then fury. The complexity and skill in conveying so much in an instant, reveals a major talent at work.

His facial expressions in the last two frames are pretty terrific as well.

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