Author Archives: kitchenfoyle

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An assessment that continues to ring true today, especially with a divisive hatemonger and cretin leading this country, so it’s good to be reminded by former President Obama in his speech yesterday that “[we’ve] got to embrace the longer and more optimistic view of history…” in spite of “a politics that threatens to turn good people away from the kind of collective action that has always driven human progress.”


Peter Hall was also co-director, albeit a mostly absent one, with Alan Ayckbourn for the latter’s hit comedy play, Bedroom Farce, in which Michael Kitchen was one of the six original castmembers. In this marvelous video from the National Theatre Ayckbourn talks of rehearsing the play and how all the actors doubted their own abilities in the weeks leading up to the premiere:

By the time we got to Birmingham, the cast was suicidal…

I think every single one of them, including Joan Hickson, the great Joan Hickson, and Michael Kitchen – wonderful cast – they all came up to me and said, “I know I wasn’t the first choice*. Uh, but, uh, I want you to know that I’m- I’m rotten at comedy. I’ve never- I’ve never liked doing comedy. Uh, and uh, I was so sorry, I’m letting down your play, and uh, I’m rubbish.”

*Ralph Richardson and Peggy Ashcroft were on the original wish-list.

Hard to imagine that Michael Kitchen with his superb comic timing once thought he couldn’t do comedy. It hadn’t occurred to me that Bedroom Farce was indeed his first major foray into comedy. Thank goodness the Birmingham audience went barmy on opening night and Michael Kitchen went on to many more roles that showcased his comedic talents.

(Also on the photostage.co.uk site, photos of Michael Kitchen in Romeo and Juliet.)






Michael Kitchen acted in two Harold Pinter plays directed by Peter Hall, No Man’s Land and Family Voices. Reading about Hall’s lifework today, I was intrigued by what he had to say about the pauses written into Pinter’s plays and the difficulty John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson had with them. I wouldn’t be surprised if Michael Kitchen was able to handle Pinter’s pauses with ease from the get-go.

Grieving for the EPA and the planet.

Scott Pruitt’s covert sabotage of the EPA is nothing short of criminal. As a threat to our future, he’s up there with Kim Jong-un.

The E.P.A.’s recent attack on a reporter for The Associated Press and the installation of a political appointee to ferret out grants containing “the double C-word” are only the latest manifestations of my fears, which mounted with Mr. Pruitt’s swift and legally questionable repeals of E.P.A. regulations — actions that pose real and lasting threats to the nation’s land, air and public health. – Christine Todd Whitman, How Not to Run the E.P.A.

In her New Yorker piece, “Earth Day in the Age of Trump”, Elizabeth Kolbert writes:

…millions of Americans will celebrate Earth Day, even though, three months into Donald Trump’s Presidency, there sure isn’t much to celebrate. A White House characterized by flaming incompetence has nevertheless managed to do one thing effectively: it has trashed years’ worth of work to protect the planet. As David Horsey put it recently, in the Los Angeles Times, “Donald Trump’s foreign policy and legislative agenda may be a confused mess,” but “his administration’s attack on the environment is operating with the focus and zeal of the Spanish Inquisition.”

Small rays of hope in Michael Bloomberg’s piece, “Climate Progress, With or Without Trump“, and Mélanie Laurent’s documentary film, Tomorrow.


That would be me if I were so lucky. I should have chosen to vacation in Siena, despite the heat!


Bizarre and dismaying to be hearing about my home turf in Irish news reports.

Grateful to have been taking in the views from Mount Brandon instead of sidestepping violent, murderous neo-Nazis invading my town with their sick and twisted reasoning.

Only one correct answer to this question:

Milner gets it right, unlike the craven, despicable man occupying the White House right now.


Not only should Netflix retain Foyle’s War, but it should change its cover art for the show to this:


Nothing like a coastal cliff walk on a sunny day.


Robert Hardy as Henry Beaumont in The German Woman


But that has nothing to do with Greta. Nobody in their right mind could possibly imagine… What I’m trying to say is that if anybody has a grudge against Greta, they- they simply don’t know her. Greta never had any time for Hitler or the Nazis or…










Henry Beaumont’s lying, and Foyle knows it.

Commemorating the passing of yet another one of the distinguished actors who guest starred opposite Michael Kitchen on Foyle’s War.


At the alarming rate that far-right judges are being appointed to lower-court benches, it won’t be long before we lose a vital bastion against Trumpism.

From The New Yorker:

McConnell didn’t just protect a Supreme Court seat for the next President; he basically shut down the entire confirmation process for all of Obama’s federal-judgeship nominees for more than a year. It’s the vacancies that accumulated during this time — more than a hundred of them — that Trump’s team is now working efficiently to fill.

McC now has the unmitigated gall to accuse Democrats of obstructionism?!





Dunkirk was spectacular and kept me on the edge of my seat throughout, but at a fraction of the budget and scale, the treatment of the momentous event in Foyle’s War was no less affecting, if not more…







And, of course, what follows is Michael Kitchen’s beautiful delivery of a speech that’s at once touching, romantic, and humorous.

Dominic Dromgoole wrote in The Sunday Times (Aug. 31, 2003):

Kitchen and Okonedo are two of our best actors. They managed to play a substantial story of growing love without any intense stares or moist lips or fidgety signals. There was a lone touching of the upper arm. What they played was a slow-growing spread of trust between two people, and what is love if not trust?

Me, too! Sophie Okonedo and Michael Kitchen are a dream team.


Michael Kitchen, Rowena Miller/Kitchen, and their son, Jack, attend Tom Stoppard’s birthday party at the Chelsea Physic Garden in London on July 1.

He’s gotten his thirty-something figure back.

Michael Kitchen and his wife were also photographed together at the 1994 BAFTA Awards where he was a best actor nominee for To Play the King.


Is it too much to ask that the POTUS possess none of the disturbing character traits exhibited in these Michael Kitchen portrayals…



and more of the qualities found in Michael Faraday and Christopher Foyle?







Way to go, DC Circuit Court of Appeals, for ruling that suspending an EPA methane rule is “unreasonable”, “arbitrary”, and “capricious” — words that could be used to describe every action of the Trump administration. (Just what we need for dealing with North Korea.)






Foyle pays another visit to Joyce Corrigan to deliver bad news about her son.

Enjoyed watching Emma Fielding last night playing a considerably larger part, Miss Galindo, a character as outspoken and right-minded as Foyle.


Latest study finds that several cups of coffee
each day is good for one’s health.



The letter Annie Lennox received reminds me of Michael Kitchen’s infamous coffee shop encounter that was so amusingly recounted by Honeysuckle Weeks for the Daily Mail:



Michael Kitchen’s pained expression here almost makes me feel sorry for Roman as he eavesdrops on Anna and hears what she really thinks of him.  Later, he spitefully repeats her words back to her.

Roman’s behavior is supposed to be that of a man unhinged, yet here we are now with a POTUS who just like Roman makes women’s flesh creep and viciously lashes out at those who speak the truth about him. Unbelievable to see lying and bullying on a par with Henry Kent coming from the POTUS.




(Spot-on commentary from LB in praise of MK’s brilliance.)


Since it’s National Handshake Day…



Like VIPs who have visited the White House this year, Jack Turner is the victim of an awkward handshake. Customary bowing, in my opinion, is preferable to shaking hands, especially when one must deal with a head of state whose hands have been grabbing the nether regions of untold women. For those with a bad back, though, I suppose a handshake is less taxing.

(Not quite the Michael Kitchen/Stella Gonet reunion I hoped for.)