Category Archives: Publicity Photos

I wonder what the winning caption for this photo was:


From the DVD bonus feature, Michael Kitchen chatting with Alison Elliot on the set of The Buccaneers.

Dancing the Virginia Reel in the ballroom scene.

 

Pity no behind-the-scenes footage of the negotiation scene.


One of the many celebrities who guest starred on Inspector Morse as noted in this Daily Mail article.


The endless lies and misdeeds perpetrated by the Trump administration and its enablers are truly head-spinning.


Smiley Face (Michael Kitchen) and Early Bird (Miranda Richardson) in a press photo for Ball Trap on the Côte Sauvage.


Listed on eBay, TV Times, October 23-29, 2004 issue with gorgeous cover, Michael Kitchen as DCS Foyle.


Glad to see that Michael Kitchen has an agent again — Independent Talent Group.




In Dandelion Dead (1994), a mustachioed Michael Kitchen plays the real-life figure, Major Herbert Rouse Armstrong, a country solicitor who was hanged in 1922 for the poisoning death of his wife. In the first part of this mini-series, Armstrong comes off as a sympathetic and somewhat humorous character, but then he starts to go off the rails and seals his own fate — a depressing development to watch.


A couple of photos taken during the filming of Casualties of War and All Clear from lastminute.com’s blog post on Hastings.

The scene as it appears in All Clear with Michael Kitchen now walking closest to the street and wearing Foyle’s coat – a must on a breezy day 🙂 :


Wouldn’t mind playing the part of the extra brushing past him.




Source: Radio Times


Prior to A&E, Michael Kitchen and Niamh Cusack also co-starred as a couple in The Art of Success, a raunchy play that required MK as William Hogarth to don a Restoration wig almost as big as the one he later wore in Lorna Doone.

From Charles Spencer’s review for the Daily Telegraph (Aug. 28, 1987) extracted at http://www.suttonelms.org.uk:

…But though I normally resent dramatists who appropriate the lives of famous figures of the past only to distort them for their own ends, I found myself increasingly warming to this vital, scatological drama, now receiving an exuberant production by the RSC in The Pit.

It is certainly not a play for the squeamish. The language is persistently and inventively foul and, without a hint of historical evidence, Mr Dear has turned Hogarth into a man of rampant and decidedly esoteric sexual tastes. But the play is so outrageous in its invention, Hogarth’s reputation so secure, that it is hard to imagine the play doing the artist’s memory permanent harm, more profitable to sit back and enjoy an evening of good, dirty and surprisingly thought-provoking fun.

More photos and notes at the Michael Kitchen site.


With Janet McTeer and Jeremy Irons in a photograph published in The Sunday Times (July 6, 1986):