Category Archives: Publicity Photos

Fierce.

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Autographed photo and letter from Michael Kitchen along with script for Reckless.

From the eBay listing:

…they are all from the same source – a gentlemen who bought them at a charity auction – I have the covering letter from the school for autism that held the charity auction after they sourced the original autograph. The date was 1998.


Newly listed on eBay, the program for the National Theatre’s production of No Man’s Land at the Lyttelton Theatre which ran from January 20 – February 24, 1977 with Michael Kitchen in the cast.

As in a theatre, the eyes of men,
After a well-graced actor leaves the stage,
Are idly bent on him that enters next,
Thinking his prattle to be tedious;
Richard II

Perhaps the case for some supporting actors but not for Michael Kitchen, who would have beguiled even if both Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir John Gielgud had left the stage.


The Railway Children #MichaelKitchen#JennyAggutter#Carlton#ITV

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Michael Kitchen#Falling#YorshireTelevision#ITV

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MichealKitchin#FoylesWar#ITV

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Magnificent photo. So-so spelling.



Faraday's Dream Michael Kitchen press photo eBay

Newly listed on eBay, a press photo of Michael Kitchen as Michael Faraday in Faraday’s Dream.


(Why was MK’s mirror image used on the DVD cover?)



Gorgeous Alibi production stills on Acorn Media’s pre-order page for the DVD.

The DVD runtime is 2.5 hours, so it seems Acorn’s release is the uncut version! It’s also in widescreen and hopefully remastered with better picture quality. Preview here.

From the New York Times, Nov. 13, 2017:

The infallible drama fodder of betrayal, love and murder gives this mini-series its edge.

If only a new Michael Kitchen project were being featured in the current NYTimes rather than a film that’s 14 years old. Sigh.



Newly listed on eBay, a press photo of Michael Kitchen as Dick Foster, who joins a biker gang in Hell’s Angel (1971), one of the episodes in the first series of BBC’s Play for Today.

Excerpted from a review by Leonard Buckley for the Times, Jan. 22, 1971:

So if your adopted son takes to a motor cycle as Dick did, and becomes a Hell’s Angel you will think him a cuckoo in the nest. Though with his anti-glare glasses and his rearing handlebars he looks more like a praying mantis. And if you are the rich widow, Cynthia, doting on your real son, Conrad, you will find him an absolute menace.

But these are arbitrary attitudes. You, your politician friend, Sir Geoffrey, and the others of your generation are all intent on your own selfish conventions. Dick needs love. You are lonely. Conrad is delinquent. But nobody really communicates. And when the Hell’s Angel and his companions beat up your stately home during the dinner party from which you have excluded him, you tell your guests that it is the gardener’s son.

This was an engrossing bitch of a play in which Mr. Agnew exposed the generation gap, the social divisions of our times and much that was disquieting besides. Katharine Blake as Cynthia, Richard Morant as Conrad, Michael Kitchen as Dick and André Morell as Sir Geoffrey sustained the unlikeable characters they were given to complete conviction and Angharad Rees as the one honest girl among the hypocrites provided the right sounding-board for our conscience.

The same generation gap and social divisions that can be seen in Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s Vietnam.


Image source: the Michael Kitchen site




Patrick Redmond Photography


Peter Hall was also co-director, albeit a mostly absent one, with Alan Ayckbourn for the latter’s hit comedy play, Bedroom Farce, in which Michael Kitchen was one of the six original castmembers. In this marvelous video from the National Theatre Ayckbourn talks of rehearsing the play and how all the actors doubted their own abilities in the weeks leading up to the premiere:

By the time we got to Birmingham, the cast was suicidal…

I think every single one of them, including Joan Hickson, the great Joan Hickson, and Michael Kitchen – wonderful cast – they all came up to me and said, “I know I wasn’t the first choice*. Uh, but, uh, I want you to know that I’m- I’m rotten at comedy. I’ve never- I’ve never liked doing comedy. Uh, and uh, I was so sorry, I’m letting down your play, and uh, I’m rubbish.”

*Ralph Richardson and Peggy Ashcroft were on the original wish-list.

Hard to imagine that Michael Kitchen with his superb comic timing once thought he couldn’t do comedy. It hadn’t occurred to me that Bedroom Farce was indeed his first major foray into comedy. Thank goodness the Birmingham audience went barmy on opening night and Michael Kitchen went on to many more roles that showcased his comedic talents.

(Also on the photostage.co.uk site, photos of Michael Kitchen in Romeo and Juliet.)









Foyle’s War press photos from the Facebook page of KBYU Eleven.


I wonder what the winning caption for this photo was:


From the DVD bonus feature, Michael Kitchen chatting with Alison Elliot on the set of The Buccaneers.

Dancing the Virginia Reel in the ballroom scene.

 

Pity no behind-the-scenes footage of the negotiation scene.


A find via the Foyle’s War Appreciation Society and tumblr, Michael Kitchen and Joanna Lumley, the latter captured in this photo blowing a kiss with The Greatest himself, are among the celebrities in the audience at the taping of Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Hits in London on June 5, 1979.


Michael Kitchen sitting with his arms crossed again next to Joanna Lumley and her son at Sotheby’s Stars Auction in 1981.


One of the many celebrities who guest starred on Inspector Morse as noted in this Daily Mail article.


The endless lies and misdeeds perpetrated by the Trump administration and its enablers are truly head-spinning.