Tag Archives: 7×3






How devastating for Foyle to find James alienated from the Devereaux family and determined to die as a traitor. And how different circumstances would be if James did know Foyle — as a father.





Foyle and James Devereaux meet for the first time.






When S7 ended, Foyle was all smiles after his replacement in the police force finally arrived, allowing him to resign and pursue other interests, including a trip to America to carry out his vow to bring Howard Paige to justice.  In 2010 Anthony Horowitz said that he very much hoped the next installment of the show could be shot in America to follow the Paige storyline.  That would have been awesome in more ways than one (MK on American soil!), but unfortunately, budget limitations precluded filming in the US.

Hoping for a book from AH someday…



Foyle gazing, as only Michael Kitchen can, at the honorable young man who may be his son.



Walking with a bounce in his wrists as well as his step.


Never a dull moment with Michael Kitchen as John Farrow.

Or as Christopher Foyle.











My top 20 Michael Kitchen roles:

3. Ex-DCS Christopher Foyle in Foyle’s War: The Hide



“I was injured in the First War – not very badly – but I was young, alone, frightened. She was a volunteer nurse.”



“I can tell you that she was desperately unhappy with the life she was leading – at her happiest when he was away – but chose to pursue that life for the sake of the child she was carrying.”

Foyle reveals his love affair with Caroline Devereaux to her son. Is he also Foyle’s son?




Having an actor as gifted and exacting as Michael Kitchen interpret one’s work is undoubtedly a huge boon to writers, but it’s not without its challenges as Anthony Horowitz has described in interviews:

Michael is as responsible as I am for the character of Foyle. Michael Kitchen has always been one of our most revered actors here in Britain. He had never done a long-running television series until Foyle’s War. The only reason he took it on, I think, was because I was able to persuade him that it wouldn’t just be a case of him getting a thud of an envelope through a door every two weeks with a new script; he would be very much part of the creative process. That is what we have done for nearly ten years. It’s not always been easy. Michael is very demanding. One of the funny things about him is that he’s the only actor I know who demands fewer lines. He’ll look at a speech and say to me, “Actually I can do all of that — five lines — with one look.” And the annoying thing is, he’s always right; he can — which means I have to write more dialogue for the other actors to fill out the episode. – PBS Q&A for Series 7

Curiously, he had never taken the lead in a long series. In part, this may have been down to his reputation for being ‘difficult’. …Was he difficult? He was certainly demanding – utterly focused on the character with a rigid determination to ensure that the integrity and the quality of the drama would never be compromised. Sometimes, he would cut or rewrite a scene hours before it was due to be filmed, and I won’t pretend that this wasn’t frustrating. But for him the performance was everything, and the result is there on the screen. I have no doubt at all that a huge part of the success of the show was down to Michael. – Daily Mail (Jan. 5, 2008)