Tag Archives: MK quotes

Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 1Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 2
Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 3Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 4
Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 5Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 6
Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 7Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 8
Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 9Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 10
Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 11Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: Michael Simkins: golf with Hugh 12
Foyle's War: A Lesson in Murder: Michael Kitchen: playing golf

Foyle’s also a bad golfer. I think it’s a wonderful game but it’s very time consuming. My eldest and I play once a year and we’ve never had enough balls to get round!

– Michael Kitchen, “Who is Christopher Foyle”, Masterpiece Mystery

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An exaggerated wink and a heartwarming smile for a grateful little boy, followed by an eye roll for pessimistic Mr. Grimwig in this delightful scene from Oliver Twist. Love how Michael Kitchen approximates his signature knee dip while seated.

Posted on QE is a marvelous behind the scenes interview with Michael Kitchen excerpted from “Oliver Twist: The Official Companion to the ITV Drama Series”. What an absolute treat to read his thoughts on costume drama, wigs, the filming process, and his character, Mr. Brownlow.


Moody continued to perform small comic roles in films and on TV, yet when asked about career highlights, he would mention a serious half-hour program filmed for the BBC in 1970. As the sadistic gym teacher Cracker Carstairs, Moody terrified his pupil Waller, played by the young Michael Kitchen in his onscreen debut, in “Is That Your Body, Boy?”

Remembering Fagin and Ron Moody, the Man Who Played Him

The role of Waller was certainly a career highlight at the time for Michael Kitchen, who spoke of it in a 1973 interview with TV Times:

“I was fascinated by TV and wanted to know what it was like. Ron Moody was in the first play I did. My parents really liked Ron Moody and so they thought I had made it when I was in a play with him. It finally made them think acting was not such a bad idea after all.”



Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 1Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 2
Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 3Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 4
Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 5Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 6
Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 7Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 8
Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 9Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 10
Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 11Alibi: Michael Kitchen: Sophie Okonedo: special speech 12

Michael Kitchen does wonders with the “particularly challenging” dialogue in Alibi.

For all of Foyle’s heralded qualities, it’s Greg Brentwood – sweet, vulnerable, naïve, and prone to panic attacks – whom I adore most.


A testimonial from Michael Kitchen for The Wireless Theatre Company:


A British Vogue piece that’s familiar from the Michael Kitchen site, but this particular copy was curiously included in a 2012 Bulletin of The British European Association of Denmark. Evidently, an old article on MK is relevant to the campaign for the rights of Britons abroad…

I think MK revealed more about himself and his approach to acting in this brief interview than in the entire 40 years since.

Based on his outfit, I’m guessing the photo was taken on the set of Sleepwalker.


Michael Kitchen attended the Kinks Musical, Sunny Afternoon, where he was recognized by a very lucky fan sitting in front of him:


The Harold Pinter Theatre where Sunny Afternoon is playing is described in this fascinating NY Times article, “Lost in the Magic of London’s Theatres”.


Alibi: Michael Kitchen: montage

My top 20 Michael Kitchen roles:

1. Greg Brentwood in Alibi (2003)

Simply love every minute of this film.

From an interview with Sophie Okonedo:

Okonedo says: “It was really good to work on and I particularly enjoyed working with Michael Kitchen – I’ve always thought he was brilliant.”

They are such an odd couple – I don’t think many people would have thought about casting Michael and I together. “They obviously thought we would be so opposite that it would be interesting and something rather rare on television.”

“It is not a comedy and it is not a straightforward thriller. I suppose it is an idiosyncratic take on a thriller about two very odd people who would not normally meet or have anything to do with each other.” Michael Kitchen describes Alibi as “perhaps a thriller”, but admits to enjoying the comic aspects of the story. He adds: “Paul Abbott is up there with the very best screen writers around, of which there are precious few.”


anonymous asked:

Where has kitchen traveled in the last years?

No idea.  I’ve always wondered if he has visited the US since he appeared on Broadway in No Man’s Land.

pdx144 said: He mentioned going to Corfu in Greece in an interview.

In this 2003 publicity release:

He says: “The first part of the year was very heavy for me; it involved making Alibi before starting this last Foyle’s War series, so after a trip to Corfu I’ve taken on as little as possible to catch up with everything that’s accumulated while my back has been turned. Voiceover stuff, including more Faking It, is as much as I’ve done and I’ve managed to say no to everything else.”


My Passion – Michael Kitchen

Add sailing to Michael Kitchen’s hobbies.  His yacht is moored in Poole Marina. A member of this football forum actually saw MK “at the self-service checkout of B&Q in Poole”. Thank you to dancesabove for sharing this splendid interview from 2008 with accompanying photo of MK and his son, Jack.


Michael Kitchen actually submitted to an interview!!!

In an email exchange, Kitchen discussed breaking a vow, his career and the symbol of respect for war’s casualties that he keeps close.

One of the “long-term offers” MK turned down was the TV series Shoestring which aired in 1979-80. The screenwriter, Robert Banks Stewart, approached him about playing the lead, but he declined saying he wanted to stick to single plays and films.


The Guilty: Michael Kitchen: Caroline Catz: charming Vey 1The Guilty: Michael Kitchen: Caroline Catz: charming Vey 2
The Guilty: Michael Kitchen: Caroline Catz: charming Vey 3The Guilty: Michael Kitchen: Caroline Catz: charming Vey 4

Barrister and soon-to-be judge Steven Vey is too charming for his own good.

steviecat123 said:

My initial response to this gifset was a sharp intake of breath at the utter gorgeousness of Michael. But as I kept looking I could see the subtle signs of menace, by the last frame as MK looks Caroline Catz up and down I was quite discomfited. I went from desire to repulsion (if I use that word WRT to MK I remind myself he is acting) in a matter of seconds. That is a reflection on MK’s broad spectrum of acting skills.

I know – that last gif has distinct echoes of Roman in Chancer, a role he did so well that the writers of The Guilty wrote the part of Steven Vey just for him, according to this article. But at this point in the story, I wonder if he had seduction in mind.  When he arrives at her flat later, he does, after all, initially decline her invitation to join her for coffee inside.

bplutchak said:

I can’t help but think that if only our dear DCS Foyle had been around, that nasty Mr. Vey would certainly have gotten what he deserved.

The MK fan in me is kind of glad his character got away with it.


anonymous asked:

How old are MK’s sons?

According to this TV Times article, MK’s older son, Jack, was born in October 1988, which would make him 24 now.  His other son, Jamie, is just over 6 years younger. Both are mentioned in the following quote reflecting MK’s dry wit:

“Fitted is now in his GCSE year, and Farmhouse is currently in second-year prep.”  Radio Times, Oct. 2004

bplutchak said:

For the longest time I didn’t get the fitted kitchen joke. I live in Wisconsin, where farms that have been around for 100 years get a plack from the governor. When houses always come with “fitted” kitchens we don’t need a special word for them.

You’re not the only one.  I didn’t get it until I saw the quote referenced on the tv.com site.  (Incidentally, your state rep and former VP nominee was sitting a few rows in front of me on the plane earlier this week. Unfortunately, not the brush with fame I dream of… )


Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 1Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 2
Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 3Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 4
Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: fishing with Andrew
Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 6Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 7
Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 8Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 9
Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 10Foyle's War: The German Woman: Michael Kitchen: Julian Ovenden: fishing with Andrew 11

The finest father and son pair to grace the screen, IMO.  I like that while the merits of fly fishing may forever be a point of contention between Foyle and Andrew, the activity is nevertheless one over which they share a special bond.  Reminds me of this TV Times interview from the early 90’s in which Michael Kitchen spoke of fishing with his own son, 5-year-old Jack:

“Wonderful weather, beautiful river and a bit of Sunday fishing with the boy,” Michael says with a smile. “We caught nothing, but it couldn’t have mattered less.”

anonymous said:

I just love those fishing scenes with CF and his son. There’s real warmth between them. That human side of Foyle was missing in the last series, and he came across as a rather cold, isolated man. I want to see his lighter side with some personal background, which is what made the first series of FW so memorable. Thanks for updating the marvellous pics from The German Woman. ****


Falling: Michael Kitchen smile yellow tint

According to this Sunday Mail article on Falling, Michael Kitchen joked about his role:

It’s probably goodbye to the fan base – I can’t see either of them approving of this.

Writing this as a member of his considerably greater than two person fan base, I not only approve, but tidbits like these really make me wish we had access to more of MK’s witty, self-deprecating sense of humor.


The Brontes of Haworth: Michael Kitchen: closeup 1
The Brontes of Haworth: Michael Kitchen: closeup 2

For The Brontës of Haworth (1973), Michael Kitchen took on the difficult portrayal of Branwell Brontë, the only brother of the famous literary sisters. Tormented by weakness, guilt, the pressure to succeed, and an ill-fated love affair, Branwell battled substance addiction and died a broken man at only age 31.  (Playing this role, MK may have felt tormented by having to wear too many layers on a hot set, as there are beads of sweat on his upper lip in several scenes.)  The Oct. 21, 1973 issue of Radio Times featured a fantastic rare and insightful interview with MK when the Brontës mini-series first aired:

The Brontes of Haworth: Michael Kitchen: Radio Times article page 1
The Brontes of Haworth: Michael Kitchen: Radio Times article page 2


Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 1Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 2
Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 3
Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 4
Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 5Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 6
Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 7Chancer: Michael Kitchen: deranged Roman 8

Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,
Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend
More than cool reason ever comprehends.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream

In this TV Times interview Michael Kitchen described his character in Chancer as a “[not] terrifically pleasant … lunatic”.  The superficial smile followed by a bone-chilling death glare certainly do suggest that Roman has a few screws loose, which is confirmed later when he kidnaps the baby.

From Patrick Stoddart’s review of Chancer for The Sunday Times (June 9, 1991):

The main waste was of actor Michael Kitchen, an actor of astonishing skills who should be doing better things than playing psychotic boyfriends of unlovable women in not-good-enough pop dramas. Despite his effortless ability to steal a scene, however, he didn’t get the best moment…


GoldenEye: Michael Kitchen: Pierce Brosnan: Evil Queen of Numbers 1
GoldenEye: Michael Kitchen: Pierce Brosnan: Judi Dench: Evil Queen of Numbers 2
GoldenEye: Michael Kitchen: Pierce Brosnan: Judi Dench: Evil Queen of Numbers 3
GoldenEye: Michael Kitchen: Pierce Brosnan: Judi Dench: Evil Queen of Numbers 4
GoldenEye: Michael Kitchen: Pierce Brosnan: Judi Dench: Evil Queen of Numbers 5
GoldenEye: Michael Kitchen: Pierce Brosnan: Judi Dench: Evil Queen of Numbers 6

When asked once if he was being considered for the role of James Bond, Michael Kitchen replied that he was “a foot shorter than the qualifying height, as well as pretty much every other qualification” (Radio Times, Oct. 2004).  He’s just right, though, as M’s Chief of Staff and Bond’s loyal ally, Bill Tanner, in GoldenEye (1995).


“For those who can’t bear being brushed, sprayed, painted, patted, combed, poked, prodded or glued… you barely know it’s happening.”

– Michael Kitchen’s praise for Sarah Grundy, his make-up artist for Foyle’s War  (thanks to the MK forum for locating this quote)

He’s not alone in his dislike of hair-and-makeup.


The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 1The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 2
The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 3The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 4
The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 5The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 6
The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 7The Last Contract: Michael Kitchen: filmed interview 8

Rare filmed interview of Michael Kitchen on the Cape Town set of Sista kontraktet/The Last Contract.