Tag Archives: Angharad Rees


Newly listed on eBay, a press photo of Michael Kitchen as Dick Foster, who joins a biker gang in Hell’s Angel (1971), one of the episodes in the first series of BBC’s Play for Today.

Excerpted from a review by Leonard Buckley for the Times, Jan. 22, 1971:

So if your adopted son takes to a motor cycle as Dick did, and becomes a Hell’s Angel you will think him a cuckoo in the nest. Though with his anti-glare glasses and his rearing handlebars he looks more like a praying mantis. And if you are the rich widow, Cynthia, doting on your real son, Conrad, you will find him an absolute menace.

But these are arbitrary attitudes. You, your politician friend, Sir Geoffrey, and the others of your generation are all intent on your own selfish conventions. Dick needs love. You are lonely. Conrad is delinquent. But nobody really communicates. And when the Hell’s Angel and his companions beat up your stately home during the dinner party from which you have excluded him, you tell your guests that it is the gardener’s son.

This was an engrossing bitch of a play in which Mr. Agnew exposed the generation gap, the social divisions of our times and much that was disquieting besides. Katharine Blake as Cynthia, Richard Morant as Conrad, Michael Kitchen as Dick and André Morell as Sir Geoffrey sustained the unlikeable characters they were given to complete conviction and Angharad Rees as the one honest girl among the hypocrites provided the right sounding-board for our conscience.

The same generation gap and social divisions that can be seen in Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s Vietnam.

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A find via the Foyle’s War Appreciation Society and tumblr, Michael Kitchen and Joanna Lumley, the latter captured in this photo blowing a kiss with The Greatest himself, are among the celebrities in the audience at the taping of Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Hits in London on June 5, 1979.

MK at 5:03 and 14:14.

MK at 6:47, 18:22, and 20:31.


Michael Kitchen sitting with his arms crossed again next to Joanna Lumley and her son at Sotheby’s Stars Auction in 1981.


Production shot of Angharad Rees and Michael Kitchen in The Picture of Dorian Gray at the Greenwich Theatre, London, 1975 (available as a greeting card at zazzle.com).  More production shots can be viewed here.

The critics were not kind to this misguided adaptation of the famous novel, and unfortunately, MK was not spared.  The review above is from Reuter, while the critic for The Spectator wrote:

The audience is at the disadvantage of not being shown the portrait in which the awful changes are occurring. Even more unfortunately, we are shown Dorian Gray himself, a golden-haired Adonis who is, quintessentially “a young man of extraordinary personal beauty … who looks as if he was made out of ivory and rose petals,” but who materialises in the person of Michael Kitchen, a no more than moderately well-graced lad with a dark and disconcerting Afro haircut. His entrance is preceded and accompanied by a delicate little peal of bells. Nothing spoils a tragedy so much as a sense of humour in a producer.

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