Tag Archives: Foyle’s War

I wonder what the winning caption for this photo was:


From an interview with Margaret Atwood in the Calgary Herald:

Asked if she binge-watches series, Atwood said she does, but with boxed DVD sets.

“What we just finished was an English series called ‘Foyle’s War,’ set in (the Second World War). It’s very good,” she said.

She added with her signature wry wit: “People of our generation like it because we recognize all the outfits. We were there.”

“Foyle’s War” is a far cry from “The Handmaid’s Tale“, but each in its way is scarily relevant today at a time when the dark undercurrents of society are coming to the fore.





Sam managed to survive her bout with deadly infectious disease. The rest of us may not be so lucky, given Trump’s determination to cut programs vital to our ability to stem a pandemic, the real threat to national security.


These two.







There’s official incompetence of the sort Foyle routinely encounters, and then there’s Trump incompetence.

I don’t think we’ve reached peak Trump. The normal incompetent person flails and stammers and is embarrassed about it. But the true genius at incompetence like our president flails and founders and is too incompetent to realize his own incompetence. …Trump’s ignorance is not just an absence [of knowledge]; it is a rich, intricate and entirely separate universe of negative information, a sort of fertile intellectual antimatter with its own gravitational pull. – David Brooks, “The Coming Incompetence Crisis






In recognition of International Women’s Day…


The Women’s Land Army hostel offers Sam, Foyle, and Milner a bed for the night and a hearty meal. I wouldn’t have guessed that Foyle was the milk with dinner type.


Listed on eBay, TV Times, October 23-29, 2004 issue with gorgeous cover, Michael Kitchen as DCS Foyle.




In Plan of Attack Foyle inherited a mess, unlike the Colonel Blimp of the very worst sort who “presided” over today’s ridiculous press conference.





Under the new attorney general a fairly satisfactory result for the likes of Sgt. Calhoun will soon become as rare as a principled, unassuming detective with eyes as riveting as Michael Kitchen’s. How dispiriting that racists still pose a menace to society today and that legitimization of their beliefs by the current commander in chief (a man who insults our intelligence at every turn but somehow gets away with it) has emboldened them. As Aziz Ansari put it so eloquently in his plea to this segment of the population, “please go back to pretending“.