Tag Archives: Hacks

Since it’s National Handshake Day…



Like VIPs who have visited the White House this year, Jack Turner is the victim of an awkward handshake. Customary bowing, in my opinion, is preferable to shaking hands, especially when one must deal with a head of state whose hands have been grabbing the nether regions of untold women. For those with a bad back, though, I suppose a handshake is less taxing.

(Not quite the Michael Kitchen/Stella Gonet reunion I hoped for.)


Michael Kitchen running on screen over the years.

Good to know that “An Hour of Running May Add 7 Hours to Your Life“.


Oscar-ready Michael Kitchen? If only. Then I’d have a reason to tune in tonight.


The first season [of The Crown] had a much-reported budget of £100 million. To put that into perspective, it works out at about ten times more than the entire series — nine seasons — of my own Foyle’s War.

– Anthony Horowitz, “Why we screenwriters want to work for Netflix more than the BBC




A Netflix stalwart and a Netflix newcomer, Michael Kitchen and Claire Foy, with nary a trilby or crown in sight.



The word “sensual” comes to mind.










A post on potty-mouthed Stanhope Feast in response to Amiga’s assertion on the MK forum that Michael Kitchen seems to enjoy using colorful language in his roles occasionally.  Englishfan’s reply cracked me up!  Yes, as long as he doesn’t start twerking, I’m good.

pdx144 said:

I am rolling on the floor! No one spits out those words like he does. Makes me laugh every time. Thanks for posting these. I needed a good MK rant.

His delivery of these profanity-laced one-liners is impeccable.

abjectadmirer said:

…but on the other hand, if he DOES start twerking, I want to see.

I’d be appalled but wouldn’t miss it for the world.




Given his aversion to the press, Michael Kitchen must have enjoyed participating in the satire, Hacks (2012), and skewering the business of intrusive celebrity tabloids.  He certainly succeeds in making Stanhope Feast, the arrogant, foul-mouthed, Rupert Murdoch-esque media baron that he plays, as unlikeable and offensive as possible. Here we see how Feast’s idea of father-son bonding differs slightly from Foyle’s!