Tag Archives: quotes about MK

Latest study finds that several cups of coffee
each day is good for one’s health.



The letter Annie Lennox received reminds me of Michael Kitchen’s infamous coffee shop encounter that was so amusingly recounted by Honeysuckle Weeks for the Daily Mail:


Amazingly lucky people who have encountered Michael Kitchen near his home.



Peter Capaldi plays the communist leader Foyle is ordered to investigate in A War of Nerves. Who will be the next Doctor Who? Came across some discussion from 1996 about how Michael Kitchen would have made a good Doctor.


First I’ve heard of Their Finest. The upcoming film adaptation sounds good. Too bad quietly devastating MK isn’t in it.




Elizabeth Addis is probably wishing she could restart her life right about now.


A spoof ad featuring voice impressions of all six James Bonds plus Michael Caine, Edward Fox, and Michael Kitchen. 🙂

Found the ad posted on the MI6Community.com forum where another member posted about meeting Michael Kitchen:

Michael Kitchen lived very close to where I grew up in the UK. I was awestruck when he visited my fathers farm one day on business. He was incredibly nice and signed my making of Goldeneye book for me. He did seem genuinely shocked to be recognised. This was before he become more well known in Foyles War.

Michael Kitchen visiting your family’s farm? How does one get so lucky?!

Seems that whenever I come across a mention of Michael Kitchen in the Bond franchise, there is agreement that he was a brilliant Tanner. Again from the MI6community forum, a comment that amused me:

Kitchen’s Tanner is the closest we’ve ever seen of the character being properly portrayed…
Now if I worked for MI6 and was sitting around doing bugger all I can imagine Kitchen giving me a bollocking…

A shame Michael Kitchen had only brief appearances in two Bond films.


A submission from Steve Mellor to the April 2016 issue of “Old Wyves’ Tales”, the newsletter for ex-pupils and staff of Michael Kitchen’s alma mater, City Boys Grammar School Leicester:

Mention of the clock tower brings memories flooding back of the nearby men’s barbers shop – Ron’s. Used by a clique of the more fashionable pupils, therefore excluding myself, Ron used to sell a concoction for holding the most difficult quiff in place – Ron’s Pink. It was a pink-coloured cream, sold in a bottle bearing a black-and-white label bearing an image of Ron and the clock tower. Much favoured by Michael Kitchen, this cream set like concrete after application, resisting wind and any physical attempts to disturb the styling.and far more effective than greasy alternatives such as Brylcreem.



Love the interview with Honeysuckle Weeks in the Spring 2015 issue of Prose ‘n Cons™ Mystery Magazine. True to form, she reveals some wonderful behind-the-scenes details about Foyle’s War and Michael Kitchen.

On Sam and Andrew:

Weeks concedes that delaying Sam’s marriage took a bit of persuasion. “There was talk of a marriage to Foyle’s son Andrew (the R.A.F. pilot) as early as series three I think, but I fought with Anthony for years to allow Sam to remain a ‘spinster of the parish.’

On whale meat:

In one scene, food shortages reduce Sam and Adam to eating whale meat as a protein source. If she looks a bit queasy, admits Weeks, “it was because I had a very hard time not retching at the smell of those whale steaks sizzling in the pan.”

On Sam and Adam’s house:

The interiors of Sam’s house were shot in a former brewery the art department turned into a sound stage. “You could still smell that oddly yeasty aroma from the fermenting hops,” says Weeks.

And on Michael Kitchen!

Considering the seriousness of the subject matter, you might assume that the set of Foyle’s War was a reserved and quiet place, but Weeks assures it was not. “If you were to go into Michael Kitchen’s trailer at lunchtime you could hear him playing the classical guitar. Or, if we happened to be filming at some grand country house, you’d often hear him behind its equally grand piano.” …Weeks prizes her relationship with Kitchen. “He is a decidedly avuncular figure in my life and a person I often go to for professional advice.”

So that’s how MK passes the time in between takes. Doesn’t really dispel the notion of a reserved set — unless he was pounding out a rock tune… 🙂

Wonder if he had a go at this piano:

Playing the piano really should have been another one of Foyle’s pastimes.


On this final day of National Library Week…

From the Glencoe Public Library blog:

There is a bit of wall in a staff area of the library where librarians for a time posted pictures of their favorite actors. One by one, the handsome men were replaced by beloved dogs, past and present. Eventually, only one man’s picture remained among the pooches. That actor? Michael Kitchen. Interpret this as you will, but it does seem to speak to the appeal of the distinguished Mr. Kitchen.

Another librarian commented on the blog, Read Roger :

…a little while back, I displayed the whole stack of [Foyle’s War] DVDs on the circulation desk. The sign just had an arrow pointing to Michael Kitchen with a note that said, “My new boyfriend.”

You wouldn’t believe the number of patrons who came in and got all gushy.





Would have been nice to have Hugh around beyond the first series. Speaking at the WSW London Equity Branch Meeting on December 3, 2015, Michael Simkins brought up Michael Kitchen during the Q&A:

I know that Michael Kitchen has his [nemesis] – he’s frustrated because he doesn’t get enough film parts.

As a fan, I certainly share his frustration. It would be great if he were offered not just more film parts but more substantial ones, too.

A Radio Times (Jan. 1, 1980) interview with Ian Holm recounted the actor’s difficulty in finding work after he left the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1967:

The world outside [the RSC] turned out to to be full of American film directors who took one look at him and said, “Sure, he’s a great little actor, but a bit on the short side, y’know?” None of his film roles gave him great scope…

Makes me wonder if Michael Kitchen faced similar obstacles.

(I had no idea what a talented writer Michael Simkins is. The weekly column he wrote for The Guardian around the time he was doing Foyle’s War is illuminating and often hilarious.)


On this frigid day…




Foyle doesn’t typically wear gloves, preferring instead to keep his hands in his coat pockets, so it must have indeed been cold out on that windy airfield as Honeysuckle Weeks described in the Daily Mail:

We’re filming on an airfield today and there’s no protection from the biting wind. At this stage in the shoot everyone, including Michael, who’s normally impervious to heat or cold, is putting on every thermal layer available to them.



Simon Day and company have begun filming the third series of Brian Pern and were back at Wembley Arena last week. Maybe someone will be nice enough to post some behind-the-scenes photos like this one from S2 posted by the prop company that supplied the Triffid plant. In a recent interview Day and Rhys Thomas discussed how they managed to obtain permission to film at Wembley and how they came by John Farrow’s yacht in A Life in Rock:

Rhys: It’s a cheap programme in a sense, because it’s in a recording studio or talking heads, so that keeps the costs down… but then you prioritise the bits you want to spend your money on. For example, we got a boat…

Simon: Where did you get that boat?

Rhys: Michael Kitchen knew someone. The idea was that his character, John Farrow, is quite wealthy. He’s sort of based loosely on Queen’s manager who lives in Switzerland and is a multi-millionaire. We needed a way to show his wealth. In Episode 3 Brian basically loses all his money in a tax scheme, and it’s quite nice to see Brian losing everything and then his manager in a Sunseeker. He just knew someone at a boat yard and a woman there said ‘oh, yeah, use one of our boats…’!


If I owned a luxury yacht (£12,000 a week to hire), I’d jump at the chance to loan one to Michael Kitchen, too.


Michael Kitchen was a great person to work with. So attentive and just great at what he does and supportive, also.
– Gary Carr






Came across a blog post from 2008 in praise of Foyle’s War and Michael Kitchen with this marvelous comment by “Juliet” underneath:

… I wholeheartedly agree with the consensus on Michael Kitchen. He is quite extraordinarily watchable and has one of those voices which affects places quite far removed from the ears! He was a brilliant Prince-Charles-alike in ‘To Play the King’, but the role which haunts me most was his portrayal of the sinister ‘gardener’ in Andrew Davies’s perfect adaptation of Elizabeth Jane Howard’s ‘Falling’ (with Penelope Wilton, also at her very best) – where he managed to be both deeply menacing and impossibly desirable at the same time. ‘Tour de force’ would not be overstating the case.


Perk of being an extra on Foyle’s War.



Foyle post-war, pre-MI5 in The Russian House.

Back in 2008 The Orlando Sentinel reported from the Television Critics Association summer tour on the possibility of a seventh series of Foyle’s War:

In especially good news, “Masterpiece” series executive producer Rebecca Eaton said that Michael Kitchen could decide to do more “Foyle’s War.”
“The producers and the writer are working hard to convince him to do it,” Eaton said.

Ever the reluctant star.